Gerald Graham Alderson BA, MB, FRCS.

Born 1884 - Died 1961 (77)

Gerald   Graham   Alderson   was   born   in   Jesmond,   Newcastle   on   Tyne   in 1884, the son of John, a lumber merchant, and Jane Isabella Alderson. He   attended   Durham   School   and   later   won   a   place   at   Caius   College Cambridge   where   he   took   a   first   class   honours   in   the   Natural   Sciences Tripos   of   1906   and   was   appointed   a   Licentiate   of   the   Royal   College   of Physicians (LRCP). He   was   appointed   a   Member   of   the   Royal   College   of   Surgeons   (M   R   C S)   in   1909   and   Bachelor   of   Medicine   and   Surgery   (M   B   B   Ch.)   in   1910, being   appointed   a   Fellow   of   the   Royal   College   of   Surgeons   (FRCS)   in July 1912. During   this   period   he   worked   at   University   College   Hospital,   London, where   he   was   obstetric   registrar,   St   Thomas   Hospital,   London   and   in hospitals in Berlin and Vienna. At    the    outbreak    of    the    First    World    War    in    1924    he    immediately volunteered   to   join   the   Royal   Army   Medical   Corps   (RAMC)   as   an   officer cadet.   He   was   gazetted   as   a   Lieutenant   on   probation   in   September   1914 and   posted   to   France.   He   was   made   full   Lieutenant   in   July   1915   and   by the   beginning   of   1918   had   achieved   the   rank   of   acting   Major.   He   was demobbed   in   1919   having   been   awarded   the   Victory   Medal   and   1916 Star. During   this   time   he   married   Marguerite   Norah   Pasteur   (b.   1893)   the wedding   taking   place   at   St   Andrews   Marylebone,   London   on   June   4 1917.   They   had   three   children   but   they   did   not   appear   to   bring   particular happiness. The   first   child   -   Raymond   Pasteur   Alderson,   b   1918   London,   died   in Libya   in   1942   whilst   serving   with   an   Ambulance   Unit   of   the   Free   French Army The   second   son   -   John   Jeffrey   Alderson   b   1921   Warwickshire   d.   1933 Warwickshire (age 12) Their   third   son,   Jeffrey   Gerald Alderson   was   born   on   9   Feb.   1934   in   York and   was   christened   at   Stoneleigh   in   July   of   that   year.   He   is   shown   as   a ‘Land Agent’ on the probate report of his father in 1961. The   family   moved   to   Warwickshire   in   1920,   firstly   to   Leamington   when Gerald   became   a   surgeon   at   Warneford   Hospital,   later   moving   to   Dudley House,    Kenilworth    before    settling    at    The    Cottage    in    the    village    of Offchurch where they were active members of the Parish Church. For   many   years   he   was   a   member   of   the   surgical   staff   of   the   Coventry and   Warwickshire   Hospital   whilst   he   also   built   up   a   thriving   practice   in South    Warwickshire    with    a    private    nursing    home    at    Priors    House, Leamington. During   the   Second   World   War   he   was   appointed   Group   Officer   in   the Ministry   of   Health’s   Emergency   Medical   Service   for   Coventry   providing advice    and    guidance    for    those    involved    in    emergency    first    aid    and casualty   management.   From   1947   to   1951   he   was   gynaecological   and obstetric surgeon to the South Warwickshire Hospitals group. His   masonic   career   began   1920   when   he   was   initiated   into   Shakespeare Lodge,   No   285,   remaining   a   subscribing   member   until   his   death.   He   was appointed   Junior   Deacon   in   1923,   Senior   Deacon   in   1924   and   installed as Master in 1927. He   was   appointed   Assistant   Provincial   Grand   Master   in   1942   –   a   post held until 1955 - and appointed Past Grand Deacon of UGL in 1947. His    other    notable    public    office    was    as    Hon.    Sec.    of    the    North Warwickshire    Hunt    and    he    died    whilst    riding    with    the    hunt    on    28th October 1961 aged 77.  He   left   an   estate,   in   today’s   values,   of   approximately   £1   million   of   which some    was    committed    to    the    purchase    of    number    23    High    Street, Warwick, now known as Alderson House in his honour. Frank Collier Archivist, Greville Lodge, September 2011. Grateful   thanks   are   extended   to   the   Library   Unit   of   the   Royal   College   of Surgeons   and   David   Baynham,   Museum   Assistant,   The   Royal   Regiment of    Fusiliers    (Royal    Warwickshire)    Museum,    in    compiling    this    short biography.
Historical Warwick

Gerald Graham Alderson BA, MB, FRCS.

Born 1884 - Died 1961 (77)

Gerald   Graham   Alderson   was   born   in   Jesmond,   Newcastle   on   Tyne   in   1884,   the   son   of   John,   a lumber merchant, and Jane Isabella Alderson. He   attended   Durham   School   and   later   won   a   place   at   Caius   College   Cambridge   where   he   took   a first   class   honours   in   the   Natural   Sciences   Tripos   of   1906   and   was   appointed   a   Licentiate   of   the Royal College of Physicians (LRCP). He   was   appointed   a   Member   of   the   Royal   College   of   Surgeons   (M   R   C   S)   in   1909   and   Bachelor of   Medicine   and   Surgery   (M   B   B   Ch.)   in   1910,   being   appointed   a   Fellow   of   the   Royal   College   of Surgeons (FRCS) in July 1912. During   this   period   he   worked   at   University   College   Hospital,   London,   where   he   was   obstetric registrar, St Thomas Hospital, London and in hospitals in Berlin and Vienna. At   the   outbreak   of   the   First   World   War   in   1924   he   immediately   volunteered   to   join   the   Royal Army Medical   Corps   (RAMC)   as   an   officer   cadet.   He   was   gazetted   as   a   Lieutenant   on   probation   in September   1914   and   posted   to   France.   He   was   made   full   Lieutenant   in   July   1915   and   by   the beginning of 1918 had achieved the rank of acting Major. He was demobbed in 1919 having been awarded the Victory Medal and 1916 Star. During   this   time   he   married   Marguerite   Norah   Pasteur   (b.   1893)   the   wedding   taking   place   at   St Andrews   Marylebone,   London   on   June   4   1917.   They   had   three   children   but   they   did   not   appear to bring particular happiness. The   first   child   -   Raymond   Pasteur Alderson,   b   1918   London,   died   in   Libya   in   1942   whilst   serving with an Ambulance Unit of the Free French Army The second son - John Jeffrey Alderson b 1921 Warwickshire d. 1933 Warwickshire (age 12) Their   third   son,   Jeffrey   Gerald   Alderson   was   born   on   9   Feb.   1934   in   York   and   was   christened   at Stoneleigh   in   July   of   that   year.   He   is   shown   as   a   ‘Land Agent’   on   the   probate   report   of   his   father in 1961. The   family   moved   to   Warwickshire   in   1920,   firstly   to   Leamington   when   Gerald   became   a   surgeon at   Warneford   Hospital,   later   moving   to   Dudley   House,   Kenilworth   before   settling   at The   Cottage   in the village of Offchurch where they were active members of the Parish Church. For   many   years   he   was   a   member   of   the   surgical   staff   of   the   Coventry   and   Warwickshire   Hospital whilst   he   also   built   up   a   thriving   practice   in   South   Warwickshire   with   a   private   nursing   home   at Priors House, Leamington. During    the    Second    World    War    he    was    appointed    Group    Officer    in    the    Ministry    of    Health’s Emergency   Medical   Service   for   Coventry   providing   advice   and   guidance   for   those   involved   in emergency   first   aid   and   casualty   management.   From   1947   to   1951   he   was   gynaecological   and obstetric surgeon to the South Warwickshire Hospitals group. His    masonic    career    began    1920    when    he    was    initiated    into    Shakespeare    Lodge,    No    285, remaining   a   subscribing   member   until   his   death.   He   was   appointed   Junior   Deacon   in   1923, Senior Deacon in 1924 and installed as Master in 1927. He   was   appointed   Assistant   Provincial   Grand   Master   in   1942   –   a   post   held   until   1955   -   and appointed Past Grand Deacon of UGL in 1947. His   other   notable   public   office   was   as   Hon.   Sec.   of   the   North   Warwickshire   Hunt   and   he   died whilst riding with the hunt on 28th October 1961 aged 77.  He   left   an   estate,   in   today’s   values,   of   approximately   £1   million   of   which   some   was   committed   to the purchase of number 23 High Street, Warwick, now known as Alderson House in his honour. Frank Collier Archivist, Greville Lodge, September 2011. Grateful   thanks   are   extended   to   the   Library   Unit   of   the   Royal   College   of   Surgeons   and   David Baynham,   Museum Assistant,   The   Royal   Regiment   of   Fusiliers   (Royal   Warwickshire)   Museum,   in compiling this short biography.
Main staircase to landing. The stair posts have been dated as 1695. Door to committee room can just be seen to far right. The next door to the left is where the lift is and the third door is at the rear of the secretaries desk and is now blocked Master Bedroom, now part of the Masonic temple. This is where the Senior Deacon has his chair. Taken in 1950 it shows Lady Ilkeston's bed  note tapestry presented by Warwickshire WI, hand made by them in thanks for her time as president. The Sitting room looking towarss the rear Garden, now part of the 'new' dinning room. The fireplace has since been removed The Drawing room looking towards High Street, now part of the 'new' dinning room. The fireplace is the reverse side of the fireplace shown in the previous photograph and which has been also been removed. Given the age of the photo, the person shown could Staircase with view to main entrance hall on High Street  this is now the, much narrower entrance to the 'new' dinning rom. The fireplace, now removed, is approx where piano is today. The door to left is still in place. Entrance hall from High Street looking towards the stairs. This is now part of the dinning room and entrance. Note: The door to left now serves the kitchens The rear of the building, almost identical to current day
Alderson   House,   Warwick   is   an   imposing   Georgian   style   3   story   building   standing   on   the   South   Side   of   High   Street   at   it   junction   with   Back   Lane,   in   the   centre   of   the town.   The   building   was   purchased   in   1961   by Alderson   House   (Warwick)   Ltd.,   a   holding   company,   which   manages   and   maintains   the   building   on   behalf   of   a   number   of local Masonic Lodges. It is named Alderson House in honour of Gerald Graham Alderson FRCS, a prominent Warwickshire Mason and Benefactor. Construction   of   this   Grade   2   listed   building   commenced   in   1695   following   the   Great   Fire   of   Warwick   which   occurred   on   June   22nd   that   year   and   which   destroyed   an existing building. It was probably completed in 1696, the date stamped on a lead rainwater head, which can be seen to the right of the rear entrance door. The   building   was   given   a   Grade   II   listing   in   January   1953   and   forms   part   of   a   group   with   all   the   buildings   on   the   South   side   of   High   Street:   Building   number:   307475 The listing describes its outstanding features as follows: “Probably   early   C18   2   storey   plus   attic   7   window   red   brick   facade   with   painted   stone   or   stucco   dressings.   Sashes   in   cased   frames   with   key   blocks,   glazing bars.   Moulded   plinth,   moulded   cornice   at   eaves   plain   string   band   at   first   floor   level.   Central   6-flush-panel   door   with   good   semi-circular   fanlight,   bolection moulded architrave, keystone, entablature. Roof of old tiles having three dormers with moulded pediments. Staircase post-1694.” The   date   of   1696   which   can   be   seen   on   the   rainwater   head   is   therefore   probably   correct   for   the   completion   of   the   house.   This   rainwater   head   was   subject   to   comment by   Pevsner   (1966),   who   described   High   Street   from   the   direction   of   Castle   Street.   He   states   “(from   Back   Lane)   there   is   then   a   sequence   of   nice   brick   facades”   and   adds a footnote “No 23, rainwater head 1696” Whilst   constructed   in   the   latter   part   of   the   17th   Century   its   origins   can   be   traced   back   several   hundred   years   to   the   mid   14th   Century.   Records   show   that   Thomas Beauchamp, 12th Earl of Warwick acquired the then existing Tudor property from a John le Boteller. The   Boteller   family   hailed   from   Wem   in   Shropshire   but   had   links   to   Warwick   and   the   Neville   -   Earl   of   Warwick   -   family   through   marriage.   (John   le   Boteller.s   grandfather, also   called   John,   married   Eleanor   de   Beauchamp   of Alcester,   Warwickshire) At   that   time   the   house   was   described   as   having   a   lane   to   .le   Breteyne.   (later   Black   lane   and now known as Back Lane) on one side. In   1352   the   Earl   let   the   property   to   a   William   Thorp   for   10s   (50p)   p.a.   Other   records   show   the   continued   use   of   the   site   in   the   ownership   of   several   local   people   (the estate of the Earl having reverted to the crown in 1590) By   1694   the   ownership   had   passed   to   a   Mr   Isaac   Tomkys   and   at   the   time   of   the   fire   is   described   as   having   been   .late   built..   It   was   clearly   was   not   of   brick   and   was probably a large Tudor style building with a brick or stone base, being completely destroyed, along with many other houses in High Street and the surrounding area. Following   the   fire   Isaac   Tomkys   received   compensation   for   the   loss   of   his   property   amounting   to   £2,724   .   7s   -   6d   approximately   £213,000   in   today.s   values   which allowed   him   to   construct   a   new   house,   the   current   number   23.   However,   the   design   was   strictly   regulated   and   resulted   in   the   brick   structure   we   see   today. The   standard design of two storeys of 10 feet in height each with cellars and garrets resulted in the facades which can still be seen along High Street and Jury Street to this day. The   regulation   of   the   style   of   the   buildings   was   instigated   by   the   Fire   Commissioners   appointed   under   the   Warwick Town Act   passed   to   ensure   the   effective   rebuilding   of the   town.   Many   of   the   commissioners.   decisions   were   based   on   the   experience   of   fires   in   other   towns,   especially   Northampton   which   occurred   in   1675. As   a   result   the high street was widened and Mr Tomkys received additional compensation for the loss of 12ft 6in (3.8mtrs) from his land. It   is   not   known   who   actually   built   the   house   but   the   commissioners   employed   surveyors   to   ensure   that   all   conformed   to   their   regulations.   Samuel   Dunkley,   mason,   was regularly   employed   in   this   work,   and   was   aided   at   various   times   by   John   Phillips   of   Broadway   (Worcs.),   carpenter,   and   William   Smith,   bricklayer.   Whilst   the   house   is   built of   brick,   this   was   quite   new   material   and   was   not   entirely   trusted,   hence   the   employment   of   carpenter   who   would   .strengthen.   the   interior   walls   by   inserting   wooden beams, evidence of which was found during recent internal alterations. The   carpenter   would   also   make   the   other   fittings   for   the   house   including   the   door   frames   and   door.   Some   of   the   original   doors   are   still   in   place   and   can   be   identified   by their narrow width and the .L. shaped iron hinges. By 1707 s Isaac Tomkys had died and records for that date show that the 20s (¡Ì1) copyhold rent was being paid by Jane Tomkie (= Tomkys), his widow. The   earliest   surviving   deeds   are   dated   1722   when   the   property   was   described   as   a   capital   ¡°messuage¡±   or   mansion   house   and   was   still   occupied   by   Jane   Tomkys, widow. In 1745 it was mortgaged for ¡Ì400 by William Tomkys and had a coach house, stable, garden, courts, yards, backsides and appurtenances. In   1752   it   was   bequeathed   by   William   to   his   nephew,   Hope   Tomkys   .   so   he   inherited   the   house   .   now   well   complete   as   a   mansion,   together   with   the   outbuildings   and garden.   In   1759   a   small   piece   of   land   (285   sq.   yds.)   was   sold   for   ¡Ì30   and   added   to   the   adjoining   property   and   in   1763   the   property   was   purchased   by   the   Earl   of Warwick. The   Commoners   Rolls   (the   ownership   of   the   property   included   the   right   to   graze   a   cow   and   a   horse   on   St   Marys   common)   commenced   in   1698   and   from   1755   they   list both   the   owner   and   occupier.   These   show   that   in   1781   the   Earl   leased   the   property   to   Rev.   William   Daniel   for   99   years   at   £284-5s-0d   (£284-25p)   +   2/6d   (12.5p)p.a., when it was tenanted by Mary Shuckburgh, widow and was described as a messuage or tenement, “a brewhouse, stable, coach house, garden and appurtenances” Later occupiers are shown as: 1804 - Rev. and Mrs. W. Daniel, 1824 - Mrs Daniel, 1842 . 1852 - Back (or Buck) and Barker and 1871 - N. G. Fetherston. It   is   unclear   when   the   building   passed   from   the   ownership   of   the   Earl   of   Warwick   but   this   may   well   have   been   in   1880   at   the   expiration   of   the   lease,   suggesting   that   a   Mr Henry Richards, manufacturer, purchased the property from the Earl, as he is shown as the occupier in 1881 The building had a number of tenants from 1881 until 1914 including; 1881 -. 82 Henry Richards, manufacturer 1883 . 84 T B Dickinson Esq. 1885 . Mrs J Lloyd 1887 . 88 Rev. Allan Edward 1889 . 1905 Major W T E Fosbury J.P. and (1904) Captain Paulet 1906 . 1909 Major Edward Burn-Callender 1911 . Venerable Rev. J H F Peile, archdeacon of Warwick 1913 . Honourable B S S Foster and Hon. Mrs Foster In   1914   it   was   purchased   by   The   Right   Honourable   Lord   (Balthazar   Stephen   Sargent)   Ilkeston   who   had   been   appointed   Stipendiary   Magistrate   of   Birmingham   in   1910 and succeeded to the title of 2nd Baron Ilkeston on the death of his father on 31st January 1913. Lord and Lady Ilkeston continued to occupy the property until Lady Ilkeston.s death in 1956, Lord Ilkeston having died in 1952. At   present   there   are   no   records   available   detailing   any   occupants/owners   between   1956   and   1961   apart   from   a   note   held   by   English   Heritage,   dated   August   1950, stating   ¡°to   be   turned   into   a   bank   when   vacated   by   Lord   Ilkeston¡±.   Whether   any   alterations   to   the   building   took   place   during   this   time   is   uncertain   but   it   was   probably then that the outbuildings adjoining Back Lane were removed and the garden redeveloped into a parking area. There   is   no   doubt   that   the   interior   has   been   altered   by   various   occupants   but   it   can   be   certain   that   the   main   staircase,   oak   flooring   and   some   panelling   are   original features. The   exterior   of   the   building   has   probably   remained   unchanged   since   the   early   1700.s   when   it   was   finally   completed   following   the   approval   of   plans   following   the   Great Fire, as evidenced by recent examination of the structure prior to the installation of a lift in the centre of the building. The   outbuildings,   variously   listed   as   a   coach   house,   stable,   garden,   courts,   yards,   backsides   brewhouse   and   appurtenances   since   1745   continued   in   existence   at   least until   the   1950.s   under   Lord   Ilkeston.s   ownership   as   they   are   included   in   a   number   of   photographs   of   the   interior   and   exterior   taken   by   J   B   Marsh   at   various   times between 1942 and 1950. Copies of these photographs are displayed in the entrance hall by kind permission of English Heritage. In   1961   the   building   was   purchased   by   Alderson   House   (Warwick)   Ltd.   on   behalf   of   a   number   of   Masonic   Lodges   based   in   Warwick.   It   is   named   Alderson   House   in honour of Gerald Alderson a prominent Warwickshire Mason and Benefactor. Alderson   House   (Warwick)   Ltd.   takes   great   care   to   maintain   the   building   in   accordance   with   the   responsibilities   placed   on   it   under   the   terms   of   the   buildings   Grade   II listing. Whilst normally closed to the public it is available for private functions. Grateful thanks are extended to English Heritage- National Monuments Records and Warwickshire County Record Office for their assistance in compiling these notes. Special thanks are due to Mr. Steven Wallsgrove of Warwick for allowing access to his extensive records of Warwick Town Buildings. Ref: ‘The Buildings of Warwickshire’, Pevsner, N and Wedgwood, A. Penguin Books, London. (1966)
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Alderson House
Historical Warwick